+1 (218) 451-4151 info@writersnest.org
Select Page

what are the special problem faced by developing countries in world trade
 
Key points to note:
The Introduction:
? It is useful to start with an introduction, which devotes a paragraph or two to explaining: (i) what question you are answering, (ii) how you intend to answer it, and (iii) very generally points in the direction of your answer.
The key sections of the essay:
? Although you may have been given different advice in the past I would recommend that you use sub-headings.
Conclusion:
? The conclusion should summarize the key points made in the essay. This is a final paragraph (or two) that brings together the various themes or elements of the essay and leaves the reader in no doubt as to your overall argument/answer.
Accurate and effective use, acknowledgement and integration of sources:
? You must cite your sources (accurately) to support the claims you make in the essay. It is important that you refer to precise pages instead of simply citing the entire article; book chapter or book.
Applying the advice above to an essay:
Question:
What progress, if any, has been made in addressing the key concerns of developing countries in the world trading system?
The Introduction:
? During the last decade the world trading system and its embodiment the World Trade Organisation (WTO) have been the target of unprecedented protests. At the heart of this discontent is the growing belief that this system is inherently unfair and serves to discriminate against the needs of developing countries. Key concerns of developing countries include protectionist practices that deny them access to developed markets, the need for more effective special and differential treatment, and issues of bias in the underlying system of governance. This essay evaluates what, if any, progress has been made in addressing these areas of concern. The essay will argue that although there is rhetorical recognition of the special needs of developing countries there has been limited real progress in addressing these concerns.
Sub-headings:
? An Unfair System
? Protectionism and Developed Market Access ? Special and Differential Treatment
? Governance and Procedures
Conclusion:
? While it is heartening that the concerns of developing countries have increased in salience, it is clear even from this brief analysis that intent does not always translate into practice. While there is progress in achieving greater market access for developing countries in sectors of importance, it is a process of ‘two steps forward, one step back’. Additionally the price for reform seems to be constant pressure to reciprocate, both in historical areas of concern as well as new areas such as services and intellectual property rights. Little progress has been made in achieving more effective SDT provisions, and even more alarming is the presence of attitudes that show reticence in allowing developing countries necessary policy space. Finally, few procedural improvements have been implemented. Given developing countries are still having to battle to have their needs attended to, clearly the Doha Round has not lived up to its moniker of ‘the Development Round’. Arguably, until there is real governance reform and a broader shift in attitudes this painstakingly slow progress towards a fairer world trading system will continue.
Accurate and effective use, acknowledgement and integration of sources:
? In-text:
? In the aftermath of Seattle there were calls for a ‘Development Round’ of negotiations and much hope was placed in the new Doha Round of negotiations (Stiglitz and Charlton, 2005:3).
? References:
? Stiglitz, Joseph E. and Andrew Charlton (2005) Fair Trade for All: How Trade can Promote
Development (Oxford: Oxford University Press). OR
? In-text:
? In the aftermath of Seattle there were calls for a ‘Development Round’ of negotiations and
much hope was placed in the new Doha Round of negotiations.1
? 1 Stiglitz, Joseph E. and Andrew Charlton (2005) Fair Trade for All: How Trade can Promote
Development (Oxford: Oxford University Press) p.3.
? Bibliography/References:
? Stiglitz, Joseph E. and Andrew Charlton (2005) Fair Trade for All: How Trade can Promote
Development (Oxford: Oxford University Press).
Essay Marking Guidelines
Content (40%)
? Relevance of the answer to the question (20%)
? Depth, breadth and variety of reading and research undertaken (10%)
? Clear, logically developed argument (10%)
Theoretical and Analytical Competence (40%)
? Understanding and use of theoretical perspectives/approaches involved in the subject area (10%)
? Ability to analyze the evidence critically (10%)
? Ability to deploy relevant and appropriate (empirical) evidence effectively (10%)
? Structure and organization of the evidence (10%)
Style and Presentation (20%)
? Quality and clarity of expression, fluency, spelling and grammar (4%)
? Accurate and effective use, acknowledgement and integration of sources (4%)
? Conformity with the required reference format (inclusive of the bibliography) (10%)
? Conformity with the rules for presentation of the essay (2%)