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Theology Case Study
The word Euthanasia is a term applied to ‘mercy killing.’ For the
purpose of putting an end to extreme suffering, or saving abnormal
babies, the mentally ill or the incurably sick from the prolongation,
perhaps for many years, of a miserable life, which could impose too
heavy a burden on their families or on society.
Euthanasia is considered a highly controversial subject, and really
brings the reality of the society we live in today, into the
limelight. In Britain today Euthanasia is illegal, and anyone who
takes part in such activities is facing potential murder charges. Some
European countries have legalised Euthanasia, such as Holland and
Switzerland, and its more controversial that people leave their home
countries to go die in another one, And the partners of those who help
in the mercy killing could face charges when they return to their home
country.
What is more controversial is the fact that people are so desperate to
rid themselves of their suffering that they’d go to these lengths.
People around the world watching are trying to run away from the fact
that whatever the people who are trying to kill themselves are going
through they might also be facing in the future and refuse to
considering what length they would go to. So the issue is not whether
Euthanasia should be legalised but maybe that we need some social
change where people feel comfortable with their lives and have
something to look forward to, despite their unfortunate circumstances.
The article I have chosen I based on the Euthanasia of a physician’s
patient, where the physician assisted in the mercy killing. All
qualified doctors have to take the Hippocratic oath to help their
patients, not end their lives so this is going against doctrine
principles not only those adopted by all major religions such as
Catholic Christians.
‘To some doctors the idea of assisting a patient in ending their life
is repugnant. Anne Rodway former deputy chairman of BMA says ‘ I want
patients to know that I have a license to heal and not a license to
kill.’
However this GP who didn’t want to be named said I had an elderly
patient with a very advanced form of cancer and she begged me to help
her die. She said that if she could reach the bleach in her kitchen
cupboard she would have drunk it. He claims he didn’t help her die but
prescribed medication in such a dose that it probably relieved a great
deal of pain and gave her a higher risk of causing death, she died a
couple days later.