+1 (218) 451-4151 info@writersnest.org

The book of Job provides a vivid illustration of the theology of suffering. In the beginning of the book, Job’s blessings are apparent. He possesses a large family, good health, many servants, flocks of multiple species of livestock, and is considered the greatest of all men in the East (Job 1.13). Job is not only cover story material for “Progressive Farmer” and “Fortune” magazines, he is more importantly a godly man, “blameless, upright, fearing God and turning from evil” (Job 1.1). In rapid succession, however, Job experiences numerous calamities. His livestock, servants, and children die, disease ravages his health, and his friends and wife become discouragers. Job wrongly believes in the retribution principle: “If a person is righteous, he will prosper; if a person is wicked, he will suffer.” The tremendous grief, loss, heartbreak, and discouragement cause Job to question his faith.
Believers and non-believers alike are often challenged by circumstances in their lives and pose the same question as Harold S. Kushner’s writing of the New York Times bestseller, “When Bad Thing…