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Protection must be guarded, justice must be served and relationships must be scared. In “Trifles”, Susan Glaspell approaches all three. By utilizing the conflict of law and justice, she explores the social struggle between man and woman as well as the separation between public and private affairs. Each aspect is developed completely in the work and help evaluate the discrepancies throughout the story. Forced to deal with a dramatic murder, a group of individuals face a complicated situation.
The news of a murder brings in Mr. Henderson, the county attorney, and Mr. Peters, the sheriff. Mr. Hale, a neighboring farmer, reveals what he witnessed. Mrs. Wright, the deceased’s wife, was rocking nervously in her chair and mentioned her dead husband lying upstairs. Mr. Hale then called in the sheriff who called in the county attorney. As they begin looking for evidence, Mrs. Peters and Mrs. Hale relocate into the kitchen to gather things to bring to Mrs. Wright to jail. The women start talking about the unhappy life Mrs. Wright seemed to have lived and the unpleasantness that was ushered i…