+1 (218) 451-4151 info@writersnest.org
Select Page

Abstract
This paper addresses the issue of the extreme increases in salaries of major league baseball players. It looks at the effects of these increases on all areas of the game, from competitiveness, to fan appeal, to financial issues. It also looks at the different perspectives of all involved, including the owners, players, and the fans. Also shown in the paper are the possible solutions to the problem of baseball salaries, along with some of the possible negative outcomes in the future if nothing is done
Baseball’s Skyrocketing Salaries
It can no longer be said that baseball is just a game. Actually, it has been many years since that statement could be considered true. Only recently, however, did the entire nation, not just sports fans realize the extent to which this fact is true. Athletes, for the most part, have always been paid better than the average American; but now, with Alex Rodriguez’s new contract, he is truthfully worth just as much as the entire franchise that he plays for.
Baseball salaries have skyrocketed out of control, and something must be done before the integrity of the game, and eventually, the game itself is destroyed. There are many reasons why this will happen, and this claim will be supported by the viewpoints of all involved, players, owners, and fans. Many of the cold, hard facts related to this salary increase will be shown, along with exactly what has caused this exponential increase in pay.
While the outcry against t…
… middle of paper …
…oonan, D. (2000, December 8). Show me the Most Money. Newsweek, 57-58.
Ozanian, M. (2000, June 12). Too Much to Lose. Forbes, 12 paragraphs. Retrieved February 24, 2001 from Friends University Library on-line Database: http://library.friends.edu:2059.
Saraceno, J. (2000 December 13). Blame Owner: Don’t Envy A-Rod’s Green. USA Today, 26 paragraphs. Retrieved from Friends University Library on line Database. http://library.friends.edu:2059.
Sullivan, R. (2000, December 25). Big Bucks and Baseball: The Idea of Overpaying for an Athlete’s Services didn’t Start with A-Rod, and it won’t stop with him. Time, 5 paragraphs. Retrieved February 24, 2001, from Friends University Library on-line Database. http://library.friends.edu:2059.