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There has been much debate about how and why humans act. One argument stems from the Causal Theory of Action. This position, popularized by philosophers such as Donald Davidson, posits that reason explanations are causal explanations: an agent’s desires, intentions, and means-end beliefs are the causes of the corresponding action. However, this claim has been heavily contended. Other thinkers, such as Ruben and Dreyfus, believe there is no intent in an agent’s actions. Instead, they argue that an agent acts based on flow, experience, and expertise; there is no overarching cause-effect relationship to action. Furthermore, this class of thought considers the Causal Theory to be associated with an inherent problem, mental overpopulation.
This phenomena can be summed in saying that the intentions, desires, wants associated with the Causal Theory are detrimental to an agent’s resulting actions. In other words, that feeling of choking, or freezing, in a pressure situation correlated with an action (particularly skilled activity) results from the overthinking and the overanalyzing that the…
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